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March 2, 2016

When giving your restaurant a facelift, the easiest way to start would be switching up the interior colours. But before you douse the space in your favourite shade, consider the following colour psychology tips. You’ll be surprised how choosing the right colour for your restaurant can go a long way; it might even help you build customer loyalty.

Reds:

Red is bold, full of vigour and eye-catching. It heightens heart rate and increases blood pressure. While it may stimulate appetite and impulse eating, the active colour may not necessarily be ideal for most restaurants. It does work well, however, for fast food joints because red helps motivate diners to leave once they finish eating. Infusing dashes of red is preferable to painting all the walls of your restaurant in that colour.

Yellows and oranges:

Yellow signifies happiness and engenders an upbeat ambience, but just like the colour red, yellow falls under “irritating”. It’s ideal for restaurants who aim for volume, meaning places that prefer a high turnover rate of customers.

Blues:

If red provokes hunger, then blue does the opposite. It decreases appetite, but evokes thirst. It’s associated with water and in an Asian belief, signifies cash flow. Blue may fare well in seafood or sushi restaurants but generally, the colour doesn’t look flattering on food. Nevertheless, it works handsomely as a complement shade.

Greens:

Green is a great pick for restaurants. It makes people feel comfortable enough to relax and stay a little bit longer. The colour is associated with nature and all things fresh, making it a popular option for restaurants serving healthier dishes. Pair green with brown or other earthy tones to make an elegant combination.

White:

We’ve covered the primary colours, but what about white? If you are short on space and would like the illusion of a bigger restaurant, then white is your colour. It exudes a sense of clarity and cleanliness, which can never go wrong in a restaurant. Balance this with accents of the colours mentioned in this list so the general look isn’t pale and boring.

Black:

Black engenders a sense of mystery, darkness and exclusivity. It might be a popular option for clothes, but it’s an irritating colour when it comes to interior. It works best as an accent.

Did these colour psychology facts change your perception on choosing the right colour for your restaurant? It’s certainly more than just picking a shade for the wall; it encompasses the colour of the furniture, cushions, lighting, lighting fixtures, table sets, floors and staff uniform. Mix and match a few colours to get that perfect combination that suits your restaurant. Just remember to balance neutral colours with accents of brighter shades!